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Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)
's really about technology. because none of these unconventional shale plays would matter if we didn't have the tech to make it economical to drill it. what we really have is an energy technology revolution and these advances aren't unique to north america. they're spreading all over the globe, and who's spearheading this transformation? who represents the vanguard of the oil revolution and its intellectual property? easy. that's core labs. clb. i like to think of it as a technology company that happens to be in the oil service business. core's proprietary technology helps oil companies figure out where to drill. it also helps them squeeze more crude out of existing reservoirs. now, core labs got hit hard today, down $3.41, 2.63%. the company just reported a terrific quarter. 7 cent earnings beat off $1.15 basis. revenue coming in higher than expected up 11% year over year. and raising its guidance for next quarter. don't have a lot of companies doing that. i think the stock bounces back and then some tomorrow. typically core labs is one of those stocks that seems to get hit every tile time
like to see, look, if mcdonald's can come out with killer products, apple -- are they both technology companies? is that where we are right now? >> apple has come out with incredible products. amazing products that have changed the world. >> that was the old days and the yankees used to be -- >> the ipad is only three years old, man. come on, give them a break. >> no. the market won't give them a break. i like the product, but who am i? >> that's complicated. >> it was not a rhetorical -- you know, we're not trying to figure out exactly whoi am. >> oh, okay. >> what we're trying to figure out how do they make i tunes better and how you want them to come out and say samsung, you're history because we have this. instead of samsung having, what? eight pages. >> you're not going get that in an earnings report. >> someone innovates and someone else comes in with a pretty good or good enough and that's why people are talking about the lower end and the medium end. >> there are some people who their samsung phones have technology whether it's the ability to change language quickly and a numb
is the next question. >> caller: the standards and technology. the agency tasked with buildis fail -- >> host three mike. do you have ollowup question? we undd whe you are going. >> caller: sample -- >> host: we'll see what the senator has to say about that. 9/11 conspiracy theories and different ways of looking at 9/11. what are your thoughts? >> guest: you know, the report that i go by is 9/11 commission frankly, many of the recommendations and assessments have become very relevant this week as we have dealt with a shocking tragedy in tbons. and, you know, actually given me this week an opportunity to reflect on how far we have come, for example, with homeland security in the ten years since that agency was created. as you noted, i'm on the home land security and government affairs committee, and, you know, they are hard at work. the joint terrorism task force through the fbi and homeland security and local officials in boston and trying to bring answers and bring ultimately the perpetrators to bear the full weight of justice in the united states. but, you know, back to the caller's questio
strategy that combines personnel, the ground, and technology like drones to monitor the border. as far as interior enforcement, there will put in place a mandatory employment verification system, e-verify. and assistant to make sure e- verify is manageable and for employers and fraud-proof, to make sure people cannot make up social security numbers or work off stolen social security numbers. host: the gang of eight spoke yesterday on capitol hill. fourrepublicans and democrats. lindsey graham of south carolina addressed concerns that he has heard from his peers about the pathway to citizenship. [video clip] >> learn the language, as a civics exams, pay a fine, work, pass a criminal background check, half of my family would be excluded. this is no easy task. [laughter] i'm glad we are not applying it to ourselves. knowope is that america i is ready for immigration reform. you look at all the polls. if the congress ready to do something that we should have done a long time ago? i really believe we are. if you think the border can be better secured, we have an idea for you to consider. if
. our efforts mandate investments in the people, processes, and technology, not just technology, people, processes, and technology. completed training to improve the quality and productivity of claims. more are being trained, and for the new employees at complete more claims per day in their predecessors. use of visibility benefits and questionnaires. online forms for submitting medical evidence has dropped average processing time as a medical exams and improved accuracy. there are now three lines for processing claims, an express line for those that will predictably take less time, a special operations lane for unusual cases or those requiring special handling, and a core lane with roughly 60 percent of the claims, and that is the remainder. technology is critical, and in the backlog. our paperless processing system, veterans benefits management system will be faster and improve access, live automation, and reduce aryans. thirty regional offices now use this. of 56 will have it by the end of this year. homelessness, the last of our three particles, to end veterans homelessness in 2015.
, but if you think about the success in reducing alcohol-impaired driving through technology, through sanctions, through education, through engineering, we can do the same thing about drugged driving. but the most important thing was atten the public, and i think that's what we've done. thank you, bob. >> we are almost out of time. but before asking the last question, we have a couple of housekeeping matters to take care of. first of all, i'd like to remind you about our upcoming luncheon events. on april 19th patrick donahoe, postmaster general, usps, will discuss challenges meeting the evolving demands of the nation's postal system. on may 7th, chris evert, tennis legend and publisher "tennis" magazine. and on june 3rd we will host the annual presentation of the gerald r. ford journalism awards. second, i would, with great feeling -- [laughter] in view of how you've covered your topic and you've generated so many questions, wow, i mean, i think -- i don't know if we keep track of a record and for handling them so well. i'd like to present you with the traditional npc mug. [applause] the scri
their purview. they reject deals with very sensitive military technologies and stuff like that. for the most part, our investment market is just about the most open and the world. i don't think quantitatively if you look at the numbers, i don't think you can quantitatively make any nonlaughable case that the united states is close to foreign investment. the question of whether i few foreign investment is a good or a bad thing what i have to tell you is this. when you are looking at foreign investment in the u.s., what it means if somebody else has dollars. they have wealth and they are choosing to buy shares in some american corporation or invest in putting together some business in the u.s.. if you are looking not as an alternative to buying goods and services from the u.s. which is what you are looking at when the u.s. is running a trade deficit, you are looking at it that thing. it's not that foreign investment itself is bad. the issue is not whether you have job creative investment and somebody putting up money to build a hotel in newport beach. the issue is not whether you have the inve
by the rules supporting our farmers, and innovating for our technology companies, or creating businesses of their own. our nation continues to benefit from immigrants, as it did when my parents came here. we need to uphold the fundamental values of family, rd work, and fairness. in vermont, immigration has promoted cultural riches, refugee resettlement, student exchange. economic development to the five regional senate programs, tourism, and trade with our friends, in that wonderful country of canada. foreign agricultural workers support vermont farmers and growers, many of whom become part of families, woven into the fabric of vermont's ag consult -- agricultural community as they have in so many other states. the dysfunction of the system affects all of us. now is our time to fix it. this is our opportunity to do it. act deliberately, but we have to act. we can talk about it, but eventually, we have to vote. millions of people. millions of americans are depending upon us. senator grassley. >> yes. on this side, mr. chairman, we understand why the secretary can't be here and we feel she
of the issues we have looked at and there are ways technology-wise to do checks. this legislation does not move in that direction. it is the opposite, prohibiting a national registry so that information about themselves are not made public and not controlled by government. they are controlled by the person who sells the gun, so therefore there is no record of gun ownership and that is specifically admitted under current law and the bills we are taking up today. the suggestion you are making is one we have had in the past. i do not think there is the legislative support to move that type of proposal, but i agree with you that it is worthy to take a look at. look at both sides had right now there is a missed trust of what government will do with that information. those answers need to be -- questions need to be answered. host: from twitter, the fact that it will not stop all people from getting guns is a weak excuse. let me put another issue on the table. you serve on the foreign affairs committee and this is the headline in the international section of "the new york times." government will do wi
plan calls for more security strategy that combines personnel, the ground, and technology like drones to monitor the border. as far as interior enforcement, there will put in place a mandatory employment garrett overification system, e-verify. and assistant to make sure e- verify is manageable and for employers and fraud-proof, to mae people cannot make up social security numbers or work off stolen social security numbers. st: the gang of eight spoke yesterday on capitol hill. four republicans and four democrats. lindsey graham of south carolina addressed concerns that he has heard from his peers about the pathway to citizenship. [video clip] >> learn the language, as a civics exams, pay a fine, work, pass a criminal background check, half of my family would be excluded. this is no easy task. [laughter] i'm glad we are not applying it to ourselves. i knowe is that america is ready for immigration reform. you look at all the polls. if the congress ready to do something that we should have done a long time ago? i really believe we are. if you think the border can be better secured, we h
records are prime targets for attackers to steal. according to the information technology industry council, 18 adults become victims to cybercrime, including identity campaigns ishing every second. this adds up to 1 1/2 million cybercrime victims each day. cyberattacks present a very real and dangerous threat to the united states, however the government currently
the door for this, but this is why i answer the way i did that i see that with the technology goings way it is and with drone technology advancing and drones getting smaller and smaller, they are not going to the the giant, big predators flying over pakistan, but little small drones to be armed with things. this is not science fiction here in terms of this is actually happening. >> booktv on location on the campus of the university of southern california at the l.a. times festival of books talking with mark mazzetti, "new york times" national security correspondent and author of this book, "the way of the knife," and, jim, you're the next caller from idaho. hi, jim. >> caller: good afternoon, gentlemen. i have a question. the la proider of servicee of to the war department in afghanistan, and i asked how the afghans were going, and i quoted him in the remark right now saying that it's basically a total failure. he went into details about that aspect of what basic means. what do you think the result is basically in afghanistan? >> well, it's obviously a question on a lot of people's mind.
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)